Workshop Schedule

Thursday April 4, 2013
  • Poems for the New Economy: Dr. Kathryn Kirkpatrick will read from a selection of poems that reflect the New Economy.
10:00a-11:00a 
Parkway Ballroom
ASU  Student Union
  • Development of Cooperatives in NC: Thomas Beckett will speak on his experiences as a founder of Ownership Appalachia, worker-owned cooperative that fosters employee ownership and the development of cooperative enterprise in Southern Appalachia. His work involves incubating cooperatives in communities without access to traditional capital or employment, and offering consulting and technical support for start-up worker cooperatives and for worker-led conversions of existing businesses to cooperatives.
11:00p-12:00p
Parkway  Ballroom 
ASU Student Union
  • The Role of the Artist and Art in the New Economy: Tommy Lee McGee 3rd, founder of the Humble Pie Tour resuming Spring 2013, will speak on the value of art, not as a commodity, but as a foundation for strong communities.
12:00p-1:00p
Linn Cove Room 
ASU Student Union
  • The Connection Between Resistance, Advocacy, and Doing for Self: Fund 4 Democratic Communities, led by Marnie Thompson and Ed Whitfield, will a discuss the interrelationship of Resistance, Advocacy and Doing-for-ourselves, (RAD), in social justice work and how this must be understood to guide our work in building a new economy.
12:00p-1:00p
Parkway Ballroom
ASU  Student Union
  • Keynote Speaker Gar Alperovitz has had a distinguished career as a historian, political economist, activist, writer, and government official. He will talk about themes from his newest book, “What Then Must We Do? Straight Talk About the Next American Revolution,” which develops a brilliant strategy for the type of transformative change that can lead America from decline to rebirth.
1:00p-2:00p
Parkway Ballroom
ASU  Student Union
  • Community as Developer: Fund 4 Democratic Communities, led by Marnie Thompson and Ed Whitfield, will examine how we understand the potential for communities to democratically come together to create the economic structures that meet their needs and provide ever increasing community wealth–making it a better place for generations yet to come.
2:00p-3:00p
Linn Cove Room
ASU Student Union
  • The Federal Reserve System: Matt Ameika will speak on the establishment of and results of a monopoly, called the “money trust,” a group of independently owned businesses which came together for the purpose of reducing or eliminating competition between themselves to enhance their profit margin or to secure their positions in the market. They monopolized the money in the US. This destroyed the ability of free market capitalism to function. The cartel went into partnership with the US government to have the force of law to operate. Both the government and the banks win. How? Governmental/Cartel Partnership: Win/Win (Except for the people).
3:00p-4:00p
Parkway Ballroom
ASU Student Union
Friday April 5, 2013
  • The Farm Bill Extension & Its Effect on Local Foods: 37 programs did not receive funding under the current Farm Bill Extension, including programs that support organic research and production, farmers markets, beginning farmers and rural communities. Jared Cates, Community Mobilizer for the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association, will provide an introduction to the farm bill and its history, and an explanation of the current extension. You will hear how the current funding cuts are affecting real people – farmers, researchers and communities – throughout the Carolinas and in your region. There will also be time for questions.
10:00a-11:00a
Beacon Heights
ASU Student Union
  • The Last American Man: Eustace Conway, Founder of Turtle Island Preserve will report on the status of the preserve and present the newly released full-length, documentary film Reconvergence, which “offers an intriguing exploration of mortality, consciousness and identity in the modern age from the perspectives of four distinct characters: a naturalist, a neuroscientist, a poet and a historian. The combination of their separate journeys creates a rich tapestry that weaves together several complex facets of the existential dilemma.” (http://www.reconvergencethefilm.com/)
11:30a-1:00p
Beacon Heights
ASU Student Union
  • Seeds of Change: A representative from the initiative will discuss their work toward a regional food shed, among other things, in the High Country.
1:00p-2:00p 
Linn Cove Room
ASU Student Union
  • Local Foods’ Role in the New Economy: Richard Boylan from the North Carolina Cooperative Extension will examine the resources and initiatives that build the state’s local food economy, from farm to fork. The Cooperative Extension is the face of Watauga county’s local foods initiative, which helps to promote North Carolina’s 10% Campaign and to guide efforts to develop the local food economy.
2:00p-3:00p 
Linn Cove Room
ASU Student Union
  • Implications of Subsidies on Small Independent Businesses: Without agriculture, civilization can’t exist. The quality of our food and how it is produced plays a major role in our health and, therefore, in our society as a whole. It seems logical, in light of these facts, that, as a society, we ought to employ regulations and restrictions to protect our food sources. More often than not, however, these regulations hurt local businesses providing quality products and services and provide massive benefits to corporations doing just the opposite. Join Andy Bratton, from Young Americans for Liberty, in a discussion about how these regulations work and of possible alternatives that will both preserve our liberties and produce quality products. 
3:00p-4:00p 
Linn Cove Room
ASU Student Union
  • NC Convergence Speaker Panel and Q&A: Guest panelists include Courtney Baines, Blue Ridge Women in Agriculture Director of Programs, Kristen Cox, Development and Communications for Self-Help Credit Union, Molly Hemstreet, Founder of Opportunity Threads, Margaret (Maggie) McFadden, Founding Director of Women Studies at Appalachian State University, and Ed Whitfield, Founder of Fund for Democratic Communities. Discussion intended to provide some historical context and an overview of some of the ways that “new economics” is relevant to different systems, including food, enterprise, education, finance, and governance. This session will lay the groundwork and establish the beginnings of a common set of ideas for the Retreat on Saturday.
2:00p-4:00p 
Beacon Heights
ASU Student Union
Saturday April 6, 2013
  • NC Student Convergence Retreat with Special Guest Speaker Juliet Schor: Visioning session to formulate the basic foundations of a statewide coalition (e.g., goals and organizational structure), identify tools for communication post-conference (including online presence), and develop the basic outline of a large, state-wide fall conference. 
9:00a-12:00p 
Great Hall
Living Learning Center
  • Plant Walk led by Marc Williams: Come join us for a walk along the Boone Greenway. We will focus on plant family patterns and what they indicate regarding identification, conservation and ethnobotanical application including potential uses of exotic invasive plants and natives for food, medicine and beauty.
1:00p-3:00p  Boone Greenway:               We will Depart from the Picnic Shelters at Clawson-Burnley Park, located off Hunting Hills Lane across from the National Guard Armory
  • Participatory Budgeting (PB): The workshop will introduce the idea of PB and lead a mock PB process that will allow participants to experience the process in action and take the first steps toward identifying possibilities for their communities.
2:00p-4:00p
Watauga Public Library Meeting Room
140 Queen St · Boone, NC
  • Endnote Speaker Juliet Schor, a sociology professor from Boston College, will deliver the endnote address that will include highlights from her book “Plenitude: The New Economics of True Wealth.”
5:00p-7:00p 
Summit Trail Solarium
ASU  Student Union